Welcome Back!

Welcome Back!

 Dear English Department students,  Welcome back, and a special welcome to first-year and newly declared English majors just joining us for the first time! It feels exciting (and a bit intimidating) to contemplate gathering again in our classrooms for the first time since the pandemic erupted. As we’ve prepared to re-open our suite on the…

The Roots of Anti-Asian Racism in the U.S.: The Pandemic and “Yellow Peril”

The Roots of Anti-Asian Racism in the U.S.: The Pandemic and “Yellow Peril”

COVID-19 has exacerbated anti-Asian racism—the demonization of a group of people based on their perceived social value—in the United States in the cultural and political life.       Professor Alexa Alice Joubin recently published an article that analyzes the language of racism and misogyny. Her article also offers strategies for inclusion during and after the…

Familiar Ambiguity: The Value of the Humanities in a Globalized World

Familiar Ambiguity: The Value of the Humanities in a Globalized World

In Professor Alexa Alice Joubin‘s recent op-ed, she championed the value of the humanities in a globalized world. The world needs good question askers as much as it needs good problem solvers. Before solving problems, we need to first identify the problems.  Great stories are often strangers at home. The best of them defamiliarize banal…

Visiting Speaker: T. Kira Madden

Visiting Speaker: T. Kira Madden

On February 16th, author T Kira Madden hosted a conversation and Q&A with Professor Annie Liontas’ Creative Nonfiction writing workshop class. Her debut memoir Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls was a New York Times Editor’s Choice selection and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize. Student April Mihalovich created an alternate cover for the…

Visiting Speakers: Cameron LeBrun & Joey Garber

Visiting Speakers: Cameron LeBrun & Joey Garber

    In early December, alumni Cameron LeBrun and Joey Garber dropped in on Professor Annie Liontas’ Nonfiction Workshop. The GW graduates collaborated on their new and innovative podcast Double Feature: Hear Me & Drinking with Ghosts. The 11-episode podcast is a humorous and fresh take on “true” crime, that investigates the murder of Alaska Curtis from…

Visiting Speaker: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Visiting Speaker: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

  On November 19, New York Times-Bestselling author Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah hosted an intimate conversation with the students of Professor Annie Liontas’ Advanced Fiction class. Adjei-Brenyah’s work has appeared or is forthcoming from a wide variety of publications, including the New York Times Book Review, Esquire, Literary Hub, the Paris Review, Guernica, and Longreads. His debut book Friday Black was…

Visiting Speaker: Jeannie Vanasco

Visiting Speaker: Jeannie Vanasco

  Jeannie Vanasco is the author of memoirs, Things We Didn’t Talk About When I Was a Girl (2019) and The Glass Eye(2017).  Vanasco visited Professor Page’s class, American Memoir, after they had read her memoir, The Glass Eye, whichexplores her grief for her late dad and his grief for his late daughter, Jeanne. She shared with students her process, ethos,…

Second Installment of #GWBookLife

Second Installment of #GWBookLife

Beginning October 27, join #GWBookLife for the second installment in the virtual book club series. Join us as we venture into a series of short stories by award-winning novelist and short-story writer Kali Fajardo-Anstine. Connect with other passionate readers within the GW community as you discover new stories and engage in witty conversation! Follow our social…

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Every October, Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebrates Native American peoples while commemorating their histories and cultures. To honor the holiday, the GW English Department has compiled a short-list of books written by Native American authors! Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo). Based on the oral traditions and ceremonial practices of the Pueblo and Navajo people, Silko’s…